Waypoint

Meet a Dronepreneur — 5 questions for Yann Huet of Geotest (in English & French)

As project leader at Geotest, a leading Swiss environmental and geoinformatics engineering firm, Yann Huet works across a large range of applications, putting modern drone technology through its paces on projects ranging from bridge inspections, dam assessments and cliff modelling.

(Lisez cet article en français)

Hi Yann. Why don’t you tell us a little about your journey into the world of drones. When, how and why did you first start thinking about and then using this technology?

Hello. Geotest employees, working in the fields of geology and the structure maintenance, are often required to inspect vertical surfaces such as cliffs and walls, and inaccessible areas such as bridge soffits and mountain sides. Traditionally this work was carried out using rope access or a cherry picker. We have been interested in the potential of using drones to carry out some of our visual inspection work since small, manageable models equipped with cameras appeared on the market.

Our team began using drones—specifically small DJI quadcopters—in 2014 to inspect cliffs that we needed to secure in order to protect roads and houses against falling stone. But then with the appearance of the albris, which combined the ability to take HD-quality pictures up very close with effective photogrammetric software, it was obvious that drones could be used for other types of Geotest activities too.

albris_uav_damn_inspection
Geotest’s team uses a senseFly albris drone for bridge inspection work in place of previous rope access and cherry picker methods.

2. Tell us about one of your favorite or most challenging drone projects. Where and what was it? What made it stand out? What did you learn?

Our most challenging projects up to now have been those where the flying conditions are complicated, either because of geography or due to a specific project’s goal.

When studying cliff faces for example, thermal currents and the topography often make flying the drone a delicate operation. When you add partial visibility, due to trees, and terrain that restricts the pilot from moving around, these factors add further difficulty. With such demanding projects, our drone operators really need to concentrate hard, so we’re always happy when the drone has landed.

When studying cliff faces, thermal currents and the topography often make flying the drone a delicate operation

Inspecting a large surface measuring thousands of square metres while achieving extremely high image definition­—i.e. a low GSD of under 1 millimetre per pixel—is also a challenge. In such cases, the drone is close to the object, which considerably limits the angle of the shots. Therefore careful flight preparation is essential to ensure we generate a quality model that is free of voids.

In the case of large concrete walls, such as dam faces or retaining walls, we subdivide the work into several blocks. However, the homogeneity of a concrete surface doesn’t always make it easy to find natural tie points to juxtapose these different blocks. Luckily, some of my Geotest colleagues are experts in rope work and can descend along the wall to add pins. During these missions, where we might flight continually for six to seven hours per day, the albris’ Distance Lock and Cruise Control features really help our pilots and make it possible to realise this kind of large surface work.

After the missions, the point when physical reality, as captured by the drone, is transformed into a digital model is always a moment of great satisfaction. But this is also where the real work begins for the geologist or engineer, since the ultimate goal of each project is to measure, analyse and extract the relevant information our customers need. In this sense, we really learn a lot, and gain a lot of experience, from each project we undertake.

3. What impact would you say drone technology has had on your working life?

At Geotest our interest in drones is twofold.

First, using drones to carry out reconnaissance flights in the field helps us to better optimise our project work. The first phase of determining the position of samples is a visual job, so being able to access places that are invisible from the ground, and locate interesting points in space and determine how to reach, really helps us to optimise our sampling campaigns. That said, if this usage results in saving time in the field, that still might not always be the case for the overall project time, as virtual exploration of the terrain often proves as time-consuming as the physical exploration!

In terms of the speed and accuracy of our measurements we’ve made a big qualitative step forwards with drones

Secondly, the ability to easily and precisely measure parameters—from the sizes of boulders to the size of cracks in concrete or volumes of contaminated earth on construction—using drone data is a new approach that greatly aids certain aspects of how we conduct projects. Being able to repeat these steps using the same flight plan and monitor these parameters over time is another plus.

barrage_surface1_small_measures
Geotest’s dam work includes using drone-produced orthophotos to take wall measurements.

All these measures were obviously possible before the arrival of drones and photogrammetry software, but in terms of the speed and accuracy of our measurements we’ve made a big qualitative step forwards with drones.

… in terms of the speed and accuracy of our measurements we’ve made a big qualitative step forwards with drones

4. What kind of role do you see drone technology playing in the future for companies such as yours? Can you imagine what your working life might look several years down the line?

Our soil scientists who are responsible for analysing the quality and fertility of soil are very interested in the recent development of multispectral drone cameras, so we’re currently setting up a project in partnership with senseFly involving use of Parrot’s Sequoia sensor.

Drones that can explore crevices and caves, such as the Flyability Elios, might also be interesting for our geologists who deal with monitoring mines, allowing them to explore difficult to access areas.

In the more distant future, the use of drones could extend to environmental applications, such as drones fitted with hyperspectral cameras helping to detect volatile substances such as methane and hydrocarbons from the sky. This would help us optimise the taking of samples for analysis, but only under certain conditions.

… drones fitted with hyperspectral cameras could help to detect volatile substances such as methane and hydrocarbons from the sky

Generally speaking though, drones are above all a flying aid for our measuring devices. On the market at present there are only drones with cameras, so their future will depend on the other technologies they are capable of carrying. Some of Geotest’s measurement tools, like radar for monitoring avalanches, weigh several hundred kilograms, so we are not ready to fly these yet.

In addition, there is an intrinsic limit to how drones can be used; their scope will probably be limited to surface documentation. Material analysis remains the core of what we do across the various professions at Geotest, so nothing will ever replace the field work and sampling required to determine the amount of clay in the soil or chlorides in concrete.

pix4dmapper_stockpile_volume
Another of Geotest’s many uses of drone data is for measuring stockpile volumes, for which it uses Pix4Dmapper software.
grindelwald_3d_drone_model
A 3D model (left), produced by Geotest using a DJI Phantom drone and AJ Soft, of a cliff just outside the Swiss village of Grindelwald. The red lines represent 2D profiles, made with Move3D, which were used to detail the face’s instability and prepare for blasting.

5. If you could give three tips to a budding dronepreneur of the future, what would they be?

  1. At Geotest we’ve chosen to go with senseFly and Pix4D technologies, which together offer a turnkey solution—from the take-off of the drone through to the creation of the final 3D model. So if you need a drone for a professional application, I would recommend turning to this type of professional solution. This avoids wasting time, plus you benefit from customer support which, up to now, has proved very efficient.
  2. Follow at least one training or seminar about drones, so that you avoid reinventing the solution to a problem that others have already solved, and avoid those you might not have considered.
  1. UAVs and their associated photogrammetry software are new tools that help us to better understand reality, so get out there and fly!

Thanks so much for your time Yann.

You’re welcome!

==============
Geotest

geotest_logo_en

Industries served: geological engineering, natural hazards, environmental, geotechnical & inspection work
Drones: 3x DJI Phantom, 1x senseFly albris 
Software: eMotion, Pix4D, AJ Soft, AutoCAD, Microstation, ArcGIS, QGIS, Move3D, Leapfrog, LARIX, GEOTEST Zinggeler/RAMMS
Avg. flights per month: 4-10
Total flight hours: 200 – 300
Dream robot: Wall-E (Pixar)
Website: www.geotest.ch   
==============

Version française

Bonjour Yann. Racontez-nous votre parcourt dans l’univers des drones. Quand, comment et pourquoi avez-vous songé à les utiliser et quand avez-vous commencé à les utiliser ?

Les collaborateurs de Geotest, travaillant dans les domaines de la géologie et de la maintenance d’ouvrage, sont souvent amenés à inspecter des surfaces verticales (falaises, murs, …) ou difficilement accessibles (sous-faces de pont, falaise de montagne). Traditionnellement, ce travail se fait soit en rappel avec une corde ou depuis une nacelle élévatrice. Geotest s’est intéressé aux drones dès l’apparition sur le marché de modèles maniables, de petite taille et équipés de bons appareils photos pour réaliser une partie de la phase d’inspection visuelle de ces travaux.

Geotest a commencé à utiliser des drones (DJI) en 2014 dans le cadre d’inspection de falaises dans le but de protéger des routes ou des maisons contre les chutes de blocs de pierre (protection contre les dangers naturels). L’apparition de l’albris permettant la prise de photo HD très proches des surfaces combinée à des logiciels de photogrammétrie efficace a rendu évidente l’utilisation des drones dans les autres domaines d’activité de Geotest.

albris_uav_damn_inspection
L’équipe de Geotest utilise un drone senseFly albris pour l’inspection de ponts, là oû des moyens plus « rudimentaires » étaient utilisés comme des réseaux de cordes…

2. Racontez-nous votre projet préféré que vous avez réalisé avec un drone ou votre plus gros challenge ? Où s’est déroulé ce projet ? Quel en était l’objet ? En quoi était-il spécial ?

Les projets les plus difficiles réalisés jusqu’à présent sont ceux où les conditions de vols étaient compliquées soit en raison de la géographie, soit à cause du but spécifique du projet.

Dans le cadre de l’étude de falaises, les courants thermiques et la topographie se conjuguent souvent pour rendre le pilotage délicat. Une visibilité partielle à cause des arbres et un terrain permettant rarement au pilote de se déplacer aisément ajoutent à la difficulté de l’exercice. Les pilotes doivent faire preuve d’une grande concentration et sont toujours contents lorsque le drone atterrit en entier.

Dans le cadre de l’étude de falaises, les courants thermiques et la topographie se conjuguent souvent pour rendre le pilotage délicat

L’inspection d’ouvrage de grande surface (plusieurs milliers de m2) avec une définition de l’image (GSD) extrêmement faible (inférieure à 1 mm/pix) est également un défi. Dans ce cas, la proximité du drone avec l’objet d’étude limite considérablement l’angle des prises de vue. Une bonne préparation des vols est donc primordiale pour assurer la génération d’un modèle de qualité exempt de zones vides. Dans le cas de grands murs en béton (barrage ou mur de soutènement), il est nécessaire de subdiviser l’ouvrage en plusieurs blocs. Cependant, l’homogénéité de la surface du béton ne permet pas toujours de trouver facilement des points d’accroche (tie points) naturels pour juxtaposer ces différents blocs. Heureusement, certains collègues de Geotest sont des experts en travaux sur corde et peuvent descendre le long de la paroi pour poser des repères. Lors de ces missions, où il est possible d’enchaîner 6-7 heures de vol par jour, les fonctions « distance lock » et « cruise control » de l’albris sont une aide considérable pour le pilote et rendent possible la réalisation de ce genre de défi.

Après les missions, le moment où la réalité physique captée par le drone est transposée correctement en modèle numérique est toujours un moment de grande satisfaction. Mais, c’est aussi là que commence le vrai travail du géologue ou de l’ingénieur. Mesurer, analyser et extraire les informations pertinentes pour nos clients reste toujours le but final de chaque projet. En ce sens, chaque mandat est riche en enseignements et vient consolider notre expérience.

3. Quel impact cette technologie a eu sur votre travail quotidien ?

Pour Geotest, l’intérêt des drones est double.

Premièrement, le fait de réaliser des vols de reconnaissance au début d’une campagne de terrain permet d’optimiser sa réalisation. En effet, la détermination de la position des prélèvements se fait en premier lieu visuellement. Avoir accès aux endroits invisibles depuis le sol, repérer dans l’espace les points intéressants et les trajets pour y parvenir, permet de réellement optimiser les campagnes de prélèvements d’échantillons. Si cela se traduire par un gain de temps sur le terrain, ce n’est pas toujours le cas pour le temps global du projet. En effet l’exploration virtuelle du terrain se révèle être souvent autant consommatrice de temps que son exploration physique.

Deuxièmement, la possibilité de mesurer facilement et précisément des paramètres aussi variés que la taille de blocs rocheux menaçants, de densité de fissures dans du béton ou des volumes de terre polluée sur des chantiers est un nouvel instrument qui facilite grandement certains aspects de la conduite de projets. Le fait de pouvoir répéter ces mesures selon le même plan de vol et de suivre l’évolution de ces paramètres dans le temps est un autre atout.

La précision et la rapidité des mesures réalisées a fait un grand pas qualitatif avec l’arrivée des drones

Deuxièmement, la possibilité de mesurer facilement et précisément des paramètres aussi variés que la taille de blocs rocheux menaçants, de densité de fissures dans du béton ou des volumes de terre polluée sur des chantiers est un nouvel instrument qui facilite grandement certains aspects de la conduite de projets. Le fait de pouvoir répéter ces mesures selon le même plan de vol et de suivre l’évolution de ces paramètres dans le temps est un autre atout.

barrage_surface1_small_measures
Les travaux d’inspection de barrage réalisés par Geotest comprennent l’utilisation d’orthophotos établis à partir de drones afin de prendre des mésures murales.

Toutes ces mesures étaient bien évidemment réalisées avant l’apparition des drones et des logiciels de photogrammétrie, mais la précision et la rapidité des mesures réalisées a fait un grand pas qualitatif avec l’arrivée des drones.

4. Quel rôle auront les drones dans le future pour une compagnie comme la vôtre ? Pouvez-vous imaginer à quoi ressemblera votre travail dans plusieurs années ?

En ce qui concerne le futur proche, le récent développement de caméras multispectrales suscite un grand intérêt de la part des pédologues de Geotest chargés d’analyser la qualité et la fertilité des sols. Un projet en partenariat avec senseFly et sa nouvelle Sequoia est d’ailleurs en cours de préparation.

Des drones permettant l’exploration de crevasses et grottes (comme l’Elios de Flyability) peuvent également être intéressants pour les géologues s’occupant de la surveillance de mines. Ils permettraient d’explorer les zones difficiles d’accès ou susceptibles de contenir du grisou.

Dans un avenir plus lointain, l’utilisation de drones pourrait s’étendre à des applications environnementales. On peut imaginer que des drones munis de cameras hyerspectrales puissent permettre de détecter les substances volatiles telles que le méthane et les hydocarbures depuis le ciel. Ceci permettrait d’optimiser la prise d’échantillon à analyser, mais n’est possible que sous certaines conditions.

On peut imaginer que des drones munis de cameras hyerspectrales puissent permettre de détecter les substances volatiles telles que le méthane et les hydocarbures depuis le ciel

D’une manière plus générale, les drones sont avant tout un support volant pour des appareils de mesure. Il n’existe pour l’instant sur le marché que des drones munis d’appareils photos, leur futur dépendra donc des technologies qu’ils seront capables d’embarquer. Certains outils de mesure de Geotest comme le radar destiné à la surveillance d’avalanches pèsent plusieurs centaines de kilos. On n’est donc pas prêt de les voir voler. De plus, il existe une limite intrinsèque aux drones : leur champ d’action se limitera probablement toujours à la surface des choses. Or l’analyse du cœur de la matière reste l’essence des différents métiers exercés au sein de Geotest et rien ne remplacera jamais le nécessaire travail de terrain et d’échantillonnage pour déterminer la quantité d’argile dans un sol ou de chlorures dans un béton.

pix4dmapper_stockpile_volume
Une autre utilisation des données de drones par l’équipe de Geotest est le calcul de volume. Résultat établie notamment par le biai du logiciel Pix4DMapper.

 

grindelwald_3d_drone_model
Un modèle 3D d’une falaise à l’entrée ouest du village de Grindelwald en Suisse. Les lignes rouges représentent les profils 2D de la falaise réalisés avec Move3D. Les profils ont été utilisés pour caractériser l’instabilité et préparer le minage.

5. Si vous pouviez donner 3 conseils à un futur dronepreneur, lesquels donneriez-vous ?

  1. Geotest a choisi de s’équiper auprès de senseFly et Pix4D qui offrent ensemble une solution clef en main depuis le décollage du drone jusqu’à l’obtention du modèle 3D. Si votre besoin d’avoir un drone est pour une application professionnelle, tournez-vous vers ce genre de solutions professionnelles. Cela évite de perdre beaucoup de temps et permet de bénéficier d’un support client qui, pour l’instant, s’est avéré très efficace.
  2. Suivez au moins une formation (séminaire ou autre) à propos des drones, cela évite de réinventer la solution d’un problème que d’autres ont déjà résolu et d’éviter ceux auxquels vous n’auriez pas pensé.
  3. Les drones et les logiciels de photogrammétrie associés sont de nouveaux outils permettant de mieux saisir le réel, alors volez !

Merci beaucoup pour votre temps Yann.

Je vous en prie !

==============
Geotest

geotest_logo_en

Industries desservies : géologie de l’ingénieur, dangers naturels, environnement, géotechnique et inspection d’ouvrages
Drones : 3x DJI Phantom, 1x senseFly albris 
Logiciels : eMotion, Pix4D, AJ Soft, AutoCAD, Microstation, ArcGIS, QGIS, Move3D, Leapfrog, LARIX, GEOTEST Zinggeler/RAMMS
Moyenne du nombre de vols par mois : 4-10
Nombre d’heures de vol totals : 200 – 300
Robot “rêvé” : Wall-E (Pixar)
Site internet: www.geotest.ch   
==============

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *